Hint – the Emigrant Lists

The new Digital Archive has not completed putting all the new features in place yet, one of the most cumbersome is perhaps the lack of ability to scroll forward and back in the emigrant lists. There is however a solution. In the address line at the top of your web browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari etc.), there is a number in the end of the line. This can be changed, and on the way you can scroll forward and backward in the source.

For example: Alfred Theodor Andersen has the web address https://www.digitalarkivet.no/en/view/8/pe00000000530936, but if we change the last two numbers to 37, using the full address https://www.digitalarkivet.no/en/view/8/pe00000000530937, we get hits on the next in line, Alfred Thorvald Torgersen. These are two cousins who journeyed to America together. This is not the best solution but it gives you the opportunity to browse in the lists.

It is still an option to use the old version of The Digital Archive.

New column in The Norwegian American

A new column, Norwegian Genealogy Detective, will start up soon in the pages of The Norwegian American. The column will be managed by Norwegian genealogist, Liv Marit Haakenstad, from Hamar, Norway. In this column, she and her research team will help people find their Norwegian Roots. The genealogical submission is open only to current subscribers of The Norwegian American. Her research team, with over seventy-five years’ experience in Norwegian and Norwegian-American genealogy, will pick one case every month, and this person will get free assistance to find their Norwegian roots. Information from the submissions and their findings will be published in The Norwegian American, and a detailed report will be sent to the person submitting the case. If more people submit questions than we have space to publish, her research team would be available privately to respond to genealogical inquiries for a fee. Haakenstad has written nine books on Norwegian emigration and genealogy in addition to more than a hundred articles, published in genealogical and computer magazines. She is a frequent contributor to the research staff of Who Do You Think You Are? TV show and is a well-known speaker at the Who Do You Think You Are? Live! conference and many others. For more information: http://norwegianancestry.com/contact/.

Nordisk Tidende online

Nordisk Tidende, the Norwegian newspaper in Brooklyn, is now online, and could be read at www.nb.no. Choose “Avansert søk” (Advanced search), “Aviser” (Newspapers), and “Nordisk Tidende” from the drop-down menu under “Tittel” (Title), and you will find the newspaper. You could also do a search for a word under “Søkestreng”, or several words like “Carl Søyland”. It is also possible to leave out words from the search, by choosing “Ingen av disse ordene” (ex. Carl), or just some words under “Noen av disse ordene” (ex. “Søyland Manhattan”), you will get a result with everybody called Søyland, but not Carl Søyland, and hits for Søyland at Manhattan. It is also an option to choose dates; “Fra dato” (from date) and “Til dato” (to date). Remember to use the Norwegian date format 03.01.1917 (3 Jan 1917).

The Table Prayer

I have travelled a lot in US, and often see The Table Prayer on the walls, and here is the correct version:

#809
Before:
1. I Jesu navn går vi til bords
og spiser, drikker på ditt ord.
Deg, Gud, til ære, oss til gavn,
så får vi mat i Jesu navn.
Amen

(In Jesus’ name we sit by the table 
to eat and drink at your word. 
By humbly honoring you God, 
we get food in Jesus’ name.
Amen)

After:
2. I Jesu navn så har vi ett,
Av dine gaver er vi mett.
Gud, gi oss derav styrke, gavn,
Så vi kan prise Jesu navn!
Amen

Source: Sangbok from Lunde Forlag og Bokhandel (publisher), 1987.

The Gateway to the New World

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I open the gate and walk down the few steps to the ocean. For many, this was “The Gateway to the New World”. Ships have been docking here at Greenock, Scotland, just one of many emigration ports, for the past 130 years. Yet today, there are no ships here. The gate is still here,…

Read more in Westby Times

Bicentennial of The Norwegian Constitution

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The service is over, and 25-year-old Ole is standing outside the Biri church. An ice-cold breeze from Mjøsa makes him shiver. It is Feb. 25, 1814, and Norway's first national elections have been held at Biri church. He is just old enough to vote, but does not meet all the requirements. He is 25 years old, but is neither married nor a landlord.

Read more in Westby Times